The Ultimate Guide to Movers

Hiring a Moving Company: The Insurance Requirement With the huge number of moves happening yearly in the United States, it’s a wonder that most of them are completed trouble-free. Working with a quality mover is certainly a must, a quality movers is always sufficiently insured. All moving companies are, in fact, obligated by law to assume liability for every single package they transport. Being a client, you are responsible for knowing the applicable charges, as well as the degree of protection you should get with every level. So what types and levels of insurance must you expect your prospective mover to provide? In general, there will be two – Full Value (Replacement) Protection and Alternative Level of Liability.
5 Key Takeaways on the Road to Dominating Businesses
Full(Replacement) Value Protection
5 Key Takeaways on the Road to Dominating Businesses
This plan has the most comprehensive coverage for moving clients nowadays. Except when you choose the Alternative Level of Liability, your shipment will automatically go under the company’s Full (Replacement) Value Protection level of liability. As per this plan, your mover may take either of the following actions in case any of your shipment is damaged or lost: > Repair the item until it assumes pre-shipment condition, or pay you the cost of repair. > Replace the lost or damaged article with an article of similar kind and quality, or pay you the total cost of replacement. With this option, the mover can limit their liability when articles of extraordinary value (items worth more than $100 per pound, such as silverware, antiques and jewelry) are lost or damaged, unless you actually specify these items on the shipping documents. Before you move, have your mover explain this limitation to you. Again, being a client, it’s your responsibility to know and understand this provision and make the needed declaration. Alternative Level of Liability This free option is the cheapest coverage you can get, but it provides very little protection. This option makes the mover liable for a maximum of 60 cents per pound for every shipped item. For example, for a 5-pound electronic equipment with a value of $1,000, loss or damage during shipment will only have the mover paying you $3, because 5 pounds multiplied by 60 cents is that amount. You will not be charged extra for this minimal protection, but in agreement to it, you have to sign a statement on the bill of lading. At any rate, take note that you have nine months to inform the moving company about any issues and file an insurance claim. So right on the day of your move, check each box and see if there are any damages. And sign the bill of lading only after you’ve made sure that there are no issues.